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2013 Annual Session - The Art and Humanity of Orthodontics: Make your Patients into Champions - Edward H. Angle Lecture

2013 Annual Session - The Art and Humanity of Orthodontics: Make your Patients into Champions - Edward H. Angle Lecture

The Art and Humanity of Orthodontics: Making Your Patients into Champions - Edward H. Angle Lecture

In this past year, we have seen a parade of Olympic champions on our television screens. What are the elements that make up a champion, and what does that have to do with us as orthodontists? Think about it, Olympians have physical skills and attributes that they have maximized to make them into world champions. But it is rarely an individual effort: they also have parents, coaches, and support systems that support and reinforce their goals. Should we consider our role as orthodontists to be part of the creation of a champion, helping a child or adult realize their goals or dreams? The role of the orthodontist has clearly become part of that important process in preparing children for competing for all the things that come with a positive appearance and a beautiful smile and the self-confidence that comes with knowing your facial appearance will not be a handicap. We can achieve this potential through the vast number of technological advancements and interdisciplinary choices we have at our disposal to offer a patient and through coordination of care. We orthodontists coach the team and encourage and direct the patient in their care because unlike any other discipline, we understand growth, maturation and aging of the craniofacial complex and the full spectrum of esthetic enhancements including orthodontics and surgery. In this presentation, we will look at how remarkably closely Edward Angle’s vision matches ours today. While he created our classification of malocclusion, he also saw the need for correction of dentofacial deformity, and essentially the attainment of beauty. Now we have an expanded vision of macro, mini and micro-esthetic treatment planning that attains esthetic refinement not imagined in Angle’s time, or even one or two decades ago!

Learning Objectives:

  • Relate the elements of dentofacial esthetics
  • Recognize the effects of maturation and aging of the craniofacial complex and its impact on adolescent treatment planning
  • Explain the role of facial esthetics in the history of orthodontics and today’s applications.

2018 AAO Annual Session - Edward H. Angle Award Lecture - Science, Practice and Ethics in Finishing Adult and Elderly Patients

2018 AAO Annual Session - Edward H. Angle Award Lecture - Science, Practice and Ethics in Finishing Adult and Elderly Patients

May 6, 2018 8:00am ‐ May 6, 2018 8:45am

This lecture presents a message to young orthodontists on the desirable future direction of our profession, based on my own experiences and what has been handed down. The following topics will be covered: The esthetic challenges related to incisor display; Reshaping teeth with deviating forms to create beautiful teeth, full interdental papillae and optimal connector areas; How-to resolve crowding and narrow smiles without lateral expansion; Handling severe periodontal destruction in adults and elderly; Limitation of failures with multistranded wire bonded retainers.

Learning Objectives:

  •  Reshape incisors to beautiful form and proper display related to patient age. 
  • Handle severe periodontal tissue break-down in adults and elderly.
  • Reduce bond failures for lingual retainers.

Edward H. Angle Award Lecture - Science, Practice and Ethics in Finishing Adult and Elderly Patients

Edward H. Angle Award Lecture - Science, Practice and Ethics in Finishing Adult and Elderly Patients

May 6, 2018 8:00am ‐ May 6, 2018 8:45am

This lecture presents a message to young orthodontists on the desirable future direction of our profession, based on my own experiences and what has been handed down. The following topics will be covered: The esthetic challenges related to incisor display; Reshaping teeth with deviating forms to create beautiful teeth, full interdental papillae and optimal connector areas; How-to resolve crowding and narrow smiles without lateral expansion; Handling severe periodontal destruction in adults and elderly; Limitation of failures with multistranded wire bonded retainers.

Learning Objectives:

  •  Reshape incisors to beautiful form and proper display related to patient age. 
  • Handle severe periodontal tissue break-down in adults and elderly.
  • Reduce bond failures for lingual retainers.

Edward H. Angle Award Lecture presented by the Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient - 30 Years of Achievements: Our Proudest Moments

Edward H. Angle Award Lecture presented by the Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient - 30 Years of Achievements: Our Proudest Moments

May 4, 2019 1:00pm ‐ May 4, 2019 2:00pm

Initially, the research efforts focused on growth, showing that it was possible to mathematically model and predict the craniofacial changes that occur. It soon became clear that relative, rather than absolute, growth was key for understanding structures’ response potentials. The focus then shifted to masticatory function and jaw kinematics, demonstrating the detrimental effects of malocclusion and the importance of neurosensory adaptation. Our work related to long-term post-treatment stability showed that orthodontic treatment is not inherently unstable; we now know what causes instability. We then went on to prove that miniscrews can cause damage and that their design can be optimized. Efforts then shifted toward accelerating tooth movements, demonstrating what works and why it works. More recently, we have focused on the diagnosis and treatment hyperdivergent retrognathic Class II's, demonstrating that it is possible to produce significant long-lasting orthopedic changes.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize that orthopedic treatments must be based on our understanding of craniofacial growth.
  • Demonstrate how occlusion influences masticatory function.
  • Understand why the effects of surgically accelerated tooth movements are limited in limited in terms of duration and scope.


2019 AAO Annual Session - Edward H. Angle Award Lecture presented by the Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient - 30 Years of Achievements: Our Proudest Moments

2019 AAO Annual Session - Edward H. Angle Award Lecture presented by the Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient - 30 Years of Achievements: Our Proudest Moments

Jul 23, 2019 4:00pm ‐ Jul 23, 2019 4:00pm

Initially, the research efforts focused on growth, showing that it was possible to mathematically model and predict the craniofacial changes that occur. It soon became clear that relative, rather than absolute, growth was key for understanding structures’ response potentials. The focus then shifted to masticatory function and jaw kinematics, demonstrating the detrimental effects of malocclusion and the importance of neurosensory adaptation. Our work related to long-term post-treatment stability showed that orthodontic treatment is not inherently unstable; we now know what causes instability. We then went on to prove that miniscrews can cause damage and that their design can be optimized. Efforts then shifted toward accelerating tooth movements, demonstrating what works and why it works. More recently, we have focused on the diagnosis and treatment hyperdivergent retrognathic Class II's, demonstrating that it is possible to produce significant long-lasting orthopedic changes.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize that orthopedic treatments must be based on our understanding of craniofacial growth.
  • Demonstrate how occlusion influences masticatory function.
  • Understand why the effects of surgically accelerated tooth movements are limited in limited in terms of duration and scope.

2021 Edward H. Angle Award Lecture; Biomechanics and Force Delivery Systems: Wires to Screws to Plastics

2021 Edward H. Angle Award Lecture; Biomechanics and Force Delivery Systems: Wires to Screws to Plastics

Jun 25, 2021 11:45am ‐ Jun 25, 2021 12:30pm

In the last two decades, clinical orthodontic practice has changed tremendously with the introduction of skeletal anchorage miniscrews and aligners. Orthodontic tooth movement takes place in response to stresses placed on periodontium with applied force system. This presentation will discuss similarities and limitations of three different appliance systems for managing complex malocclusions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Evaluate advantages and limitations of treatment with braces, mini screws and aligners.
  • Recognize common side effects and how to minimize them.
  • Apply appropriate force system for various tooth movements.

AAO 2021 Annual Conference - 2021 Edward H. Angle Award Lecture; Biomechanics and Force Delivery Systems: Wires to Screws to Plastics

AAO 2021 Annual Conference - 2021 Edward H. Angle Award Lecture; Biomechanics and Force Delivery Systems: Wires to Screws to Plastics

Jun 25, 2021 11:45am ‐ Jun 25, 2021 12:30pm

In the last two decades, clinical orthodontic practice has changed tremendously with the introduction of skeletal anchorage miniscrews and aligners. Orthodontic tooth movement takes place in response to stresses placed on periodontium with applied force system. This presentation will discuss similarities and limitations of three different appliance systems for managing complex malocclusions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Evaluate advantages and limitations of treatment with braces, mini screws and aligners.
  • Recognize common side effects and how to minimize them.
  • Apply appropriate force system for various tooth movements.

2022 Edward H. Angle Award Lecture; Evolution of Orthodontics: From Angle to Artificial Intelligence and Beyond

2022 Edward H. Angle Award Lecture; Evolution of Orthodontics: From Angle to Artificial Intelligence and Beyond

May 22, 2022 10:30am ‐ May 22, 2022 11:15am

From an initial gradual evolution since the days of Edward H. Angle that primarily focused on fixed appliances and appliance design, orthodontics has undergone increasingly rapid advances. Borrowing from discoveries and successes in other fields, these include the incorporation of novel materials, technologies and now increasingly the integration of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) in image recognition, treatment decisions, 3D printing and fabrication of custom devices and appliances. Beyond AI, the next era of orthodontics will increasingly embrace biologics and omics towards precision/personalized delivery of care. Dr. Kapila will highlight both the current and upcoming rapid changes that the profession is experiencing and how orthodontists, educators, scholars and industry can be better prepared for novel approaches to data capture, integration, diagnostics, treatment decisions and care delivery.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recall historical foundations of discoveries and their applications to patient care in orthodontics.
  • Describe the current cutting-edge clinically valid technologies and approaches ripe for integration into practice.
  • Summarize the applications of upcoming megatrends in AI and omics towards implementation of precision orthodontics.

2023 Edward H. Angle Lecture; Our Art and Science as a Foundation for Clinical Practice

2023 Edward H. Angle Lecture; Our Art and Science as a Foundation for Clinical Practice

Apr 23, 2023 10:50am ‐ Apr 23, 2023 11:50am
The specialty of orthodontics has a rich history of achievement in terms of education, research, technology, and clinical care. The success we pleasantly enjoy is deeply rooted in our past. We have identified orthodontic problems and, over time, sought to resolve those problems so that our treatments are more efficient, effective, and valued. This presentation will describe the problems of our past and the solutions that have been developed. In addition, several problems that are poorly based in science and have not been conquered will be noted as a direction for the future.